Abortion rights challenged by new laws

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Abortion rights challenged by new laws

PHOTOS BY LORIE SHAULL/WIKICOMMONS

PHOTOS BY LORIE SHAULL/WIKICOMMONS

PHOTOS BY LORIE SHAULL/WIKICOMMONS

By Alli Weseman, PHOTO EDITOR

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Democratic political clubs came together to rally for reproductive rights in front of Hayward City Hall on June 9. This comes at a time when abortion rights in 16 states have come under threat of being cut as lawmakers challenge Roe v. Wade.
This was the latest rally that has been held since Alabama Governor Kay Ivey signed one of the strictest and controversial anti-abortion bills in the country. The bill bans all abortions except if the mother’s life is at risk or if the fetus cannot survive, according to Time Magazine.
“In California, we are really safe because if Roe v. Wade was overturned and it became state’s rights, California has the least restrictive laws in the country all already, we are safe,” said Fun Progressives Chair Kelsey Pressnall.
Across the United States, reproductive rights have been challenged by lawmakers to possibly have the Supreme Court revisit Roe v. Wade, the 1973 case that legalized abortion.
In states that have passed anti-abortion legislation, it bans abortion after six or eight weeks, before a woman may realize that she is pregnant. The bills do not make any exceptions for rape or incest victims. It instantly makes performing an abortion a felony and doctors may face life in prison.
“In 1973 when Roe v. Wade was passed in the courts, it provided women with economic justice. The ability to get out of abusive marriages, women that couldn’t afford another child because she would lose her job,” said Alameda County Democratic party member Robin Torrelo. “The Republican party has been using culture wars and the right of abortions to keep women down, in the house and under control.”
In recent years, women have found that they must overcome more obstacles in order to get an abortion as states, particularly in the South have placed restrictions on abortion clinics. This has caused many to close. As a result, women are forced to drive long distances to get an abortion.
In June, Missouri almost became the first state without an abortion clinic before a judge blocked lawmakers from closing down the state’s lone Planned Parenthood.
In May, pro choice advocates held rallies in cities across the United States, such as San Francisco and San Jose to protest the abortion ban that forces women to choose between their lives or keeping an unwanted pregnanacy.
“When we talk about being pro-choice it is just that. You are supposed to remove the religious argument, you are supposed to remove moral argument, from any decision. Whether you want to have an abortion or keep your child or you want to give that child up for foster care or adoption, it is your choice,” said Hayward City Councilmember, Aisha Wahab.