CSUEB art gallery hosts annual exhibit

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CSUEB art gallery hosts annual exhibit

PHOTOS BY VANESSA MARTINEZ/THE PIONEER

PHOTOS BY VANESSA MARTINEZ/THE PIONEER

PHOTOS BY VANESSA MARTINEZ/THE PIONEER

By Alexa Felix, CONTRIBUTOR

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Have you ever set your mind to something but never had the courage to see it through? Have people laughed in the face over your dream and shown you nothing but adversity? Maybe this caused you to hide away or give up…or maybe this was the building block in the foundation of your dream that was yet to be. If you had the chance to make your dream a reality even if it was decades later, would you?
Matt Richie, American artist, illustrator, craftsman, and California State University, East Bay alumni, had a dream and while it has taken a lot of time to fully become a reality, he has done it. Richie has contributed his “Bay Area Toile” piece to the University’s Art Gallery for their new Fall Fusion Annual Faculty and Alumni Exhibition.
The “Bay Area Toile” wallpaper features handwritten illustrations of Bay Area icons such as rapper Mac Dre, newscaster Dennis Richmond, and quarterback Joe Montana as well as classic Bay Area landmarks.
Ritchie graduated in 1993 with a Bachelor’s degree in Art. Since his time away from school, he has grown into a well-accomplished artist and shares his work, not only to the world but to his alma mater. Richie’s “Bay Area Toile” piece can be found at the University’s Art Gallery along with several other artists. The art gallery hosted Ritchie’s work from Sept. 10 to Oct. 24.
Aaliyah Evans, the assistant curator, emphasized that every exhibition is unique in its own way and that it is important to see it while it is up. This exhibit is also Evans’s first exhibition that she created on her own with the helping hand of Carolina Gainey-Vejar, gallery curator.
“The content is extremely different because this is the only one that is exclusively faculty and alumni. Whereas other exhibitions are open to students as well or other types of artists,” said Evans. “Also the difference is the curation, the structure of the exhibition. No exhibition is the same. The art will never be the same.”
Even though students could not participate in this exhibit, they will have plenty of other opportunities to show off their work. Any form of art is acceptable to the University Art Gallery including painting, filmmaking, architecture, ceramics, sculpting, and photography. If you wish to sell your artwork, name a price and the gallery will give you your earnings if a fan wishes to purchase your piece.
“If someone is willing to create it, we’re willing to put it up,” said Evans. “Not only that but it’s free, completely free. You don’t have to pay to get into this gallery. You don’t have to pay to put your work in.”