NBA considers lowering draft age to 18

Back to Article
Back to Article

NBA considers lowering draft age to 18

PHOTOS BY PHIL ROEDER/WIKICOMMONS

PHOTOS BY PHIL ROEDER/WIKICOMMONS

PHOTOS BY PHIL ROEDER/WIKICOMMONS

By Xavier Clark, CONTRIBUTOR

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story







Kobe Bryant, LeBron James, and Tracy Mcgrady are a few of the notable names that have been drafted into the NBA straight out of high school.
Since 2006 and the introduction of the “one-and-done” rule, players that have had dreams of going to the NBA had to wait a year after their high school career to be eligible to enter the draft.
More recently, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver played with the idea of lowering the draft age back down to 18 and eliminating the one-and-done rule altogether. In February, the NBA sent a proposal to the NBA Players Association to propose lowering the draft age, according to USA Today.
The proposal came just after the number-one draft prospect, Zion Williamson, from Duke University injured himself in a game against rival University of North Carolina.
With all the hype around Williamson – who is projected to be the next coming of James – the injury he sustained has fans worried that his NBA debut will be delayed.
The removal of the one-and-done rule is supported by players and NBA administration alike.
“I don’t understand the point of it,” DeMarcus Cousins of the Golden State Warriors told reporters. “What’s the difference between 18 and 19 and 17 and 18? You’re immature, you’re young, you’re ignorant to life in general. So what’s really the difference? You’ve still got a lot of growing to do as a man.”
This could be good for young players with aspirations of playing in the NBA, but this could be troubling for the NCAA.
California State University, East Bay Men’s Basketball coach, Bryan Rooney, said the elimination of the one-and-done rule would lead to adjustments in the recruiting process.
“I don’t know if negative would be the best adjective that I would use,” Rooney said in an interview. “I think in many ways the responsibilities of programs is adapting to the climate of the culture. If there was an elimination to the one-and-done rule, there are very smart people at the recruiting level that would be able to make adjustments and keep their programs going.”
Of course, not every talented athlete that goes to the NBA comes straight out of high school, but money for ticket sales generated by big names like Williamson will now be in limbo.
In his latest game against the University of North Carolina, the cheapest ticket to go see the phenom was $2,500. With the omission of the one-and-done rule, future stars like Williamson would surely immediately declare for the NBA draft and take their ticket sales with them.
Many have come to criticize the NCAA for lack of compensation to student-athletes who bring millions in revenue to their schools and the association. Utah Jazz guard Donovan Mitchell spoke on his criticism of the NCAA via Twitter in late February while watching the Duke vs. North Carolina game.
“Again let’s remember all the money that went into this game…and these players get none of it…and now Zion gets hurt…something has to change,” said Mitchell. He also tagged the NCAA in the tweet.
When asked if he thought players received fair compensation for all of the effort student-athletes put in, Coach Rooney said there is merit in having a college education that will serve athletes long after they stop playing.
“In every player’s career, the ball stops bouncing. To be able to have an education and a degree to use for the rest of a student-athletes life is beneficial.”
With the one-and-done rule no longer being enforced, the Zions and LeBrons of today’s youth will have the opportunity to go straight from high school to play professional sports.