The Pioneer

Social media saved local DJ’s album release

Graphic by Tam Duong Jr./The Pioneer

Gabriel Rubio,
Contributor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






DJ and music producer known as Mimosa was set to release his new album “Sinner/Saint” with a free performance on Friday at 4:20 p.m. at Mad Monk Center for Anachronistic Media, a music store in Berkeley.

Advertisements promoted Mimosa as a DJ who sold out shows worldwide, and would deliver a mesmerizing performance, one that would transport fans and make them feel like they were experiencing a small piece of a day at Coachella or the Electric Daisy Carnival in Vegas. But, these feeling and emotions were lost when the free event did not take place.

The live performance was projected to begin at 4:20 p.m. but as fans arrived, there was no indication that a concert was taking place. An empty stage with an employee taking part in what seemed to be a sound check dealing with technical issues was instead happening. At 4:25 p.m. Mimosa stepped on the stage with a confused expression as he stared at the speakers above. According to Rasputin Music-Berkeley, the host of the event, they cancelled the show due to technical issues and a last-minute pushback of the release date.

By approximately 4:50 p.m. the set was being taken down. Attendees of the concert seemed upset and confused. “Not only am I disappointed that I had to wait an hour in traffic and adjust my schedule, I am really frustrated that the event was cancelled,” said Fremont resident Jaspreet Mann, 18.

DJ Mimosa needed a solution. He took to Facebook Live at 6:31 p.m. to release new music his fans had expected to hear at the canceled performance. Since Facebook Live allows artists to interact with fans instantly through video that records real-time action, Mimosa was able to dance along to electronic dance beats as he played each track from his Sinner/Saint Album. As Mimosa encouraged fans to purchase new music, viewers could leave comments on the new album, like “fresh”, “good work”, and “your music takes me places.”

The Facebook interface also allowed fans who did not live near the Berkley area to be apart of the album release, which created a much larger audience. According to Mimosa’s Facebook page, he received nearly 100 comments and approximately five thousand views, none of which would have happened if the Rasputin Music-Berkeley event had actually taken place.

Rasputin Music-Berkeley did not proactively communicate with fans. Those who had signed up for the Rasputin Music-Berkeley facebook event did not receive any proper notification about the cancelation until 10:16 a.m. the next morning. They provided no concrete details or further updates on social media. Director of Special Events for Rasputin Music Cameron Jackson told the Pioneer the reason of the cancellation was announced only to a few people who attended the event.

“Mimosa is actually going to be releasing the EP on vinyl so it made more sense to postpone the listening party until the vinyl release,” Jackson told the Pioneer in an email. “Also we had a few technical issues with the very expensive sound system we purchased and so we didn’t feel that it would truly represent the quality of Mimosas sound.”

The high prices of major raves, festivals, and concerts prevent many middle-class individuals from attending. With tickets ranging anywhere from $200 to $600 dollars, concert seekers look for alternatives that will allow them to stay under budget. The reason for alternative options is due to the fact that many fans wanting to attend concerts do not have the funds that will allow them to attend the expensive events.

Mimosa’s free listening party at Rasputin Music-Berkeley was supposed to be an event for money saving individuals but the cancellation let down fans craving for the experience of a live concert. The personal Facebook Live video saved the release by pleasing fans who can now listen to the music online wherever they go, which creates a concert-like feel.

Applications like Facebook Live need to be promoted so that people who are not able to attend concerts will have the same experience as those who spend hundred of dollars. Musical events are a way for fans to interact with their favorite artist and without the funds the experience will not be created. Everyone deserves the capability to enjoy music in a public forum that will create memories, feelings, and emotions.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    Rave culture descends on the Bay Area

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    2018 laws have affected marijuana consumers and culture

  • Arts & Life

    Beauty trend creates business opportunity for CSUEB student

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    ‘The Post’ has the most to boast from coast to coast

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    ‘Coco’ is the movie we’ve been waiting for

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    DU-High: Drugged driving is drunk driving

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    Pioneer Photography: Redlands rapper Lil Xan flows into Berkeley

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    Justin Timberlake pays tribute to the late Prince

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    Controversial H&M ad should not never happened

  • Social media saved local DJ’s album release

    Arts & Life

    Adobe Art Gallery features Bay Area Artists

California State University East Bay
Social media saved local DJ’s album release