The Pioneer

A role model in Ros Gold

Marissa Marshall,
Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Women across the globe are defeating the odds in sports media and are taking on highly esteemed roles in the broadcasting and analytic fields. The Golden State Warriors reporter Rosalyn Gold-Onwude, otherwise known as Ros Gold, is one of these women.

Gold-Onwude has become one of the most recognized faces for women in sports media as an analyst for the Warriors, the best team in the NBA, for the past two years. Not only that, but she is also an African-American Girl’s Catholic High School Athletic Association Hall of Famer, having played Division 1 basketball.

She is one of the very few women of color that has achieved a position reporting on national television for both women’s and men’s sports — a huge turning point for the sports media field.

The Associated Press editors commissioned a report by the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in sports in 2012 and found that 90 percent of sports reporters are white and 90 percent are male. The sports media field has always been male-dominated, and when women did have the opportunity, they typically were white.

The total number of women in ESPN’s sports media field is 57, only seven of whom are women of color.

In an interview with NBC, Gold-Onwude said, “As a woman of color in sports broadcasting, I want to do good work and have a positive, visible influence and I hope other young women will look at what I’m doing and realize they too could have a career in sports media if they desire.”

Ros Gold and other minority women, like Cari Champion, a former ESPN host and current host of SportsCenter, and Jemele Hill, host of ESPN’s Numbers Never Lie and His & Hers, are certainly doing their part to buck the trend.

They are breaking down the barrier for other women of color and women in general who have aspirations of a career in sports media, just like me. It not only gives me hope that my goals are attainable, but that I can also reach the highest level possible, covering professional sports.

Attaining a job in the sports media field is hard to achieve for a female because many find the opinion of a woman less credible, perhaps because the woman hasn’t played football, or because women’s sports are not put on the same pedestal as men’s. Therefore people think a woman cannot speak knowledgeably about sports.

But this is far from the truth and Gold-Onwude has proved that. Individuals see her on the screen every time the Warriors play and the work she has done to get where she is shows. In 2011, the former Stanford star was even invited to play for the Nigerian National team in the 2012 Olympics. She is a Nigerian-Russian woman, which places her in the minority in sports media, but she has bucked the trend and made a name for herself. Gold-Onwude has opened the gate a little more for women like me who one day want to be in her position.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Tradition nonexistent in my college experience

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    How the newspaper changed my life

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Black people need gangster rap music

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Wrestling is fake, but who really cares?

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Dogs are the new life savers

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    If you don’t love me at my September 16, you don’t deserve me at my Cinco de Mayo

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Beyonce reminds us of the power of Black Women

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    ‘Far Cry 5’ explores dangers of extremism

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    Walt Disney Studios turns classic animations into live action adaptations

  • A role model in Ros Gold

    Opinion

    A teen activist is born

California State University East Bay
A role model in Ros Gold